Dr. Samuel H Sidlinger

When sixteen years old, after two unsuccessful attempts to enlist for service during the Civil War, being rejected on account of his youth, he succeeded in getting in as a musician and for eighteen months served as a member of the regimental band of the Fourteenth Ohio Infantry. He then enlisted in the hospital corps of the One Hundred and Twentyfifth Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, in which he served until the close of the war, being mustered out on June 30, 1865. Upon the conclusion of his military service this young soldier returned to his home at Napoleon and for nearly nine years was engaged there as a clerk in a drug store, meanwhile giving his serious attention to the reading of medical literature. He then entered the medical department of the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor and was graduated from that institution in the spring of 1874, with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. 

Dr. Samuel H Sidlinger

sidlinger

Lucinda Welty Sindlinger

lucinda weltey sidlinger

Thus admirably equipped for the practice of his profession, Doctor Sidlinger returned home and opened an office at Napoleon and was engaged in practice there for six months. It was during this time that the great grasshopper scourge turned the attention of the whole country to the sufferings of the victims of that visitation in Kansas, and there was no more sympathetic contributor to the relief of those sufferers than Doctor Sidlinger. That fall Doctor Sidlinger decided to locate in the West. At Hutchinson he found what seemed to him the very spot he was seeking and in 1875 he settled in the struggling little village on the plain and established a permanent office, an exercise of judgment he never has regretted

History of Reno County, Kansas: its people, industries and ..., Volume 2
By Sheridan Ploughe


Dennis Stephens (#48479779) has added the obit

Obituary- (Hutchinson (KS) Herald, Dec. 29, 1935)- Dr. S. H. Sidlinger, pioneer Hutchinson physician Civil War veteran, community builder, and one of this city's most colorful characters, died at 6:45 o'clock last night at the family home, 203 East First st. He was 90 years old. The venerable white-bearded doctor and old soldier had been an invalid almost a year, ever since he suffered a hip injury in a fall early in 1935. "Doc" Sidlinger was a sort of landmark in Hutchinson ever since he came here on a visit during the historic grasshopper invasion of 1874. The whole nation was aiding "stricken Kansas." Young Sidlinger came here on a visit, liked the region, and stayed. A few months later he brought his wife. Sixty years ago, in 1875, they built the house at the southeast corner of First and Poplar sts. At the time of its construction the house stood on a spot where there was nothing but rolling prairie to the south, east and north. The grand old man who was a prominent resident of Hutchinson for 61 years had a hand in developing the city from a village of less than 500 persons. He retained a lively interest in public affairs and was active in Joe Hooker post of G.A.R. until less than two years ago.

Dr. Sidlinger was born on June 23, 1845 "at 6 o'clock in the morning, an 8-pound boy and everybody happy" to use a favorite description of that occasion as he himself phrased it. Dr. Sidlinger was a great narrator and was always good for an historical story. He talked entertainingly of incidents in his own life, especially his experiences in the Civil war. After several vain attempts young Samuel Sidlinger enlisted in the band corps of the Fourteenth Ohio Infantry. When he was mustered out and was about to follow his father back home, the family physician, who was surgeon of One Hundred and Twenty-fifth Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, made it possible for young Samuel to enlist in the hospital corps. He and his stretcher boys followed the army into every important battle in the Civil War. They were at Missionary Ridge, Shiloh, Atlanta, Appamatox, Lookout Mountain, all the major engagements of the Civil war.

When still a soldier, around eighteen years old, Dr. Sidlinger cast his first vote. It was for Abraham Lincoln as president. The general of his corps told the youngsters that they were men fighting for their country and as such, were entitled to vote. For the seventy years Dr. Sidlinger was a dyed in the wool Republican, proud of his party. After more than four years of service the Civil war came to a close and young Samuel was mustered out of the army before his 21st birthday. Then came a job working in a drug store, and later Dr. Sidlinger attended the medical college at the University of Michigan and in 1874 was graduated with the degree of Doctor of Medicine.

In the early 80's Dr. Sidlinger founded the Sidlinger Drug Store which has been a landmark in Hutchinson for half a century. "Doc" Sidlinger was one of the first physicians in Hutchinson and had the distinction of practicing here longer than any other. He practically retired from active practice about 10 years ago. Beginning in 1914 "Doc" Sidlinger was an enthusiastic motorist. He was fond of driving and as capable a driver as most men twenty years his junior. Probably he was the oldest automobile driver in this section. Surviving are a daughter, Mrs. Lila Innes of the home address; one grand daughter, Miss Katherine Innes; also at home; a sister, Mrs. A.S. Hess, 228 East Sherman st.; one brother, W.N. Sidlinger, Napoleon, O.; three nephews, Will and Sam Sidlinger and Arthur Hess of Hutchinson; and two nieces, Mary and Katherine Hess of Hutchinson.


On June 30, 1868, Dr. Samuel H. Sidlinger was united in marriage to Lucinda Welty,who was born at New Philadelphia, Ohio, daughter of John and Sarah Welty, the former of whom was a farmer who later moved to Newton, Jasper county. Iowa, where he and his wife spent their last days. To this union one child was born, a daughter, Lila, who married Fred A. Innes and lives in Oklahoma. In 1875, the year he located in Hutchinson, Doctor Sidlinger built a comfortable brick house at the corner of First and Poplar streets, and there he and his wife still make their home, being very pleasantly situated.

History of Reno County, Kansas: its people, industries and ..., Volume 2
By Sheridan Ploughe

Dennis Stephens (#48479779) has added the obit


Obituary (Hutchinson (KS) newspaper, 1922)- There passed away at 1:10 o'clock this morning, in the home in which she had come as a young wife almost half a century ago, and where she has lived ever since, one of Hutchinson's most loved matrons and pioneer residents, Mrs. Dr. S. H. Sidlinger. For 8 or 10 years Mrs. Sidlinger has been an invalid, attended throughout by her faithful companion, a constant sufferer, but ever cheerful, calm, courageous. Saturday morning she was taken with a severe spell, such however as she had frequently had, and so it was a shock to all when death came, quietly and peacefully early this morning. "I am going to rest," she remarked, with a smile, as she passed away. Her husband, her only child, a daughter, Mrs. Lila Innes, who lived with her and her grandchild, Miss Katherine Innes, also a member of the home, were with her at the end. Probably nobody in Hutchinson was better known than Mrs. Sidlinger. And yet she had never been active in society or club circles. She was a home body, loving her own home, and taking little part in affairs outside. But nobody had a kinder heart, a more loveable soul, a more Christian spirit than this splendid pioneer woman of Hutchinson.

It was 47 years ago that Dr. Sidlinger brought his young wife to Hutchinson. He had come here the year before, in the fall of 1874, and built their home, the brick residence at First and Poplar, where they ever since have made their home. Then he went back to Napoleon, OH, and brought Mrs. Sidlinger here in the following spring, 1875. And for 47 years she has lived here in the same residence. She loved the home too much to leave it for any other. Mrs. Lucinda Sidlinger was 76 years of age. She was born in Tuscarowas County, OH, near New Philadelphia, in 1846, and was educated in the high school at Massillon, OH. In the '60's the family moved to Iowa, locating at Newton, IA. Dr. Sidlinger had been reared in the same county in Ohio, and after he had come home from the Civil War he went out to Iowa, and in 1868 was married to the young woman he had known in the home county, and took her back to Ohio as his bride. Dr. Sidlinger was engaged in the drug business and as a physician at Napoleon, until they removed to Hutchinson a few years after, where he continued his practice as a physician and druggist. The Sidlingers had a prominent part in the early history of Hutchinson. The death of Mrs. Sidlinger is mourned by many who knew and loved her. The funeral arrangements will be announced later. The deceased is survived by only one near relative besides the immediate family, a brother, Isaac Welty, living near Memphis, TN, on a rice plantation in southeast Arkansas.